Decks, Center City, Patios

DOUBLE DECKER

3RD STORY DECK WITH PILOT HOUSE (THAT VIEW!)

3RD STORY DECK WITH PILOT HOUSE (THAT VIEW!)

When the homeowner for whom we built a pilot house and roof deck on Manton Street sent me a text about an additional deck, I was momentarily confused. Um, on top of the roof deck? I wondered. "2nd flr" he responded. Ah, silly me.

At the end of 2012 we had converted part of the roof and third floor bedroom into a pilot house, incorporating a large closet for the master suite into the design. We also built a roof deck with MoistureShield composite decking and railings. The deck and homeowner were later featured in a Philadelphia Inquirer article called Roof Deck is Liberating for Point Breeze Couple.

The homeowner wanted to add a deck off the rear 2nd floor of his 3-story row home. But we were also given two parameters– no support posts for the deck could block the cityscape view from the ground-level patio (outside corners were ok). And the underside of the deck needed to be watertight so the homeowners could sit outside and enjoy the view even during a rainstorm. Gotcha.

The basic construction of the deck was straightforward. We converted a window in the 2nd floor office / bedroom to a door and framed a 16-foot wide by 14-foot deck. We matched the MoistureShield decking and posts of the roof deck (luckily the line hadn’t been discontinued, always a risk in my world) as well as using the Mantis hidden fastener system to hide the screws.

ALL DECKED OUT

ALL DECKED OUT

To preserve the city view from the ground, we had to bridge the full 16-foot length of the deck without mid-span supports. We doubled up a 1 ¾” x 14” exterior grade laminated beam – I’ve seen too many decks eventually start to sag in the middle to take a shortcut there.

CUSTOM DRAINAGE SYSTEM

CUSTOM DRAINAGE SYSTEM

We hadn’t built a drainage system for the underside of a deck before. There are several systems available, but we wanted to keep labor and material costs at a minimum for our celebrity client, ha. So we designed a water run-off system using corrugated plastic pitched into a gutter which feeds directly into a storm water drain.

Not sure if the Inquirer will come back for the 2nd deck though…